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Newton

805 West 25th Street,

Newton, NC 28658

828-464-0244 Phone

828-464-0019 Fax



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We provide compassionate care to individuals who prefer to remain in the comfort of their own home, despite circumstances that make it difficult for them to do so. We understand that home is where you want to be and we intend to help you stay there as long as possible.

This branch treats the following conditions:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (better known as ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) is a disease that affects the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.  Progressive degeneration of the motor neurons that communicate with the muscles leads first to the loss of muscle control and eventually to paralysis and then death.

Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita (AMC) is a disease affecting newborns which causes stiffness in the joints and muscle weakness.

Autoimmune diseases cause the body ‘s immune system to attack itself, rather than working to heal itself.  Examples of autoimmune diseases include lupus, AIDS, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile diabetes, and pulmonary fibrosis.  The presence of one autoimmune disease makes a patient more susceptible to developing an additional autoimmune disease.

Cardiac anomalies refer to a range of conditions that affect the heart, ranging from heart murmurs to hypertension to angina.  Some are caused by lifestyle and diet, and others are congenital (present from birth).

Traumatic injury refers to damage to the body caused by force or violence (for example, a car accident, a gunshot wound, or a fall).  Catastrophic injury is an injury that creates a permanent disability, such as paralysis or chronic pain, which dramatically alters a person’s life and the lives of their loved ones.  Some examples of catastrophic injury include accidental amputation, severe burns, blindness, or paralysis.

Chromosomal abnormalities refer to anomalies in the number or structure of chromosomes, the structures that hold our genes. Some examples of conditions caused by chromosomal abnormalities include Down Syndrome and Turner Syndrome.

Cystic fibrosis is a life-threatening, inherited condition that causes cells in the lungs to create excess amounts of mucus, causing severe damage to the lungs and to the digestive system.

Endocrine disorders refer to a range of conditions that affect the endocrine glands.  Interference with the endocrine glands affects the hormones that help to regulate appetite, breathing, growth, and more.  Conditions caused by endocrine disorders include diabetes and hyperthyroidism.

Gastrointestinal disorders refer to a range of conditions that affect the gastrointestinal (digestive) system, ranging from mild conditions like diarrhea to life-threatening conditions like stomach cancer. A gastrostomy is a surgical procedure for inserting a tube, used for feeding or drainage, through the wall of the abdomen and into the stomach.  Some conditions which may call for a gastrostomy include a birth defect which interferes with an infant’s ability to nurse, or an obstruction in the digestive system such as a peptic ulcer or a tumor.

Gastrointestinal disorders refer to a range of conditions that affect the gastrointestinal (digestive) system, ranging from mild conditions like diarrhea to life-threatening conditions like stomach cancer. A gastrostomy is a surgical procedure for inserting a tube, used for feeding or drainage, through the wall of the abdomen and into the stomach.  Some conditions which may call for a gastrostomy include a birth defect which interferes with an infant’s ability to nurse, or an obstruction in the digestive system such as a peptic ulcer or a tumor.

IV, or intravenous, therapy, delivers medicine or other liquid directly into a patient’s bloodstream through injection into a vein.

A medical diagnosis determines the presence of a disease or condition through the examination of physical symptoms, medical history, and/or clinical findings such as laboratory test results.  A surgical diagnosis (a biopsy, for example) requires a surgical incision into the patient’s body in order to evaluate the presence and/or cause of a disease.

For patients with mid-stage Parkinson’s, dementia, and cancer, medicine and treatments that were once effective may become less so, new problems may present themselves, and new treatments may become necessary. “Mid-stage” refers to the time when these changes appear, whether they occur soon after a diagnosis is made or years later.

Mitochondria are compartments within cells that help to create the energy needed to sustain life and support growth. Mitochondrial disease causes cell injury and cell death, causing a range of symptoms from developmental delays to visual and hearing problems to liver and other diseases.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that causes a person’s immune system to attack the protective (myelin) sheath covering the nerves.  Symptoms vary widely, from an absence of symptoms to a loss of movement.

Neurological disorders refer to a range of conditions that affect the neurological (nervous) system, including epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis, and migraines.

Orthopedic injuries are injuries to the musculoskeletal system, including bone and joint damage, arthritis, sports-related injuries, and chronic pain. Orthopedic injuries or conditions are often treated with physical and occupational therapy.

Pallative care serves to improve the comfort and quality of life for patients and their families.  Rather than treating a medical condition, palliative care is directed toward the prevention and relief of pain and suffering and includes psychological and spiritual aspects of care.

Quadriplegia and paraplegia are caused by damage to the spinal cord resulting in paralysis and loss of sensation.  Paraplegia refers to paralysis from the waist down.  Quadriplegia refers to paralysis from the shoulders down.

Respiratory disorders refer to a range of conditions that affect the respiratory (breathing) system, ranging from mild conditions like the common cold to life-threatening conditions like bacterial pneumonia and lung cancer.

Injury to any part of the spinal cord or to the nerves at the end of the spinal cord can cause changes to a patient’s movement and/or sensory functions, ranging from a loss of sensation to total paralysis.

A tracheostomy is a surgical procedure to create a hole in a person’s windpipe in order to assist breathing.  The procedure is used in emergency situations when the airway is obstructed, or when certain health conditions, such as vocal cord paralysis or throat cancer, require the long-term use of a ventilator.

An organ transplant involves receiving a donated organ such as a kidney, liver, heart, intestine, or cornea.

Traumatic brain injury refers to brain dysfunction caused by force or violence (for example, a car accident, a gunshot wound to the head, or a fall).  Traumatic brain injury can cause temporary dysfunction, long-term brain damage, or death.

Patients whose conditions interfere with their ability to breathe or swallow may need to be placed on a ventilator and/or monitored to ensure that their airways remain clear.  Some causes for airway closure include some sedative drugs associated with surgery, which can relax the airway muscles and suppress the urge to breathe; spinal injuries; lung disease; neuromuscular disease; or sleep apnea